Last night I took a short break from swatch making to finish the first fingerless mitt in a pair I’m making. I’m using the pattern Green Thumb by Diana Foss that a raverly friend of mine gave me. While I love the pattern, I felt like it needed some serious colorwork. I altered the pattern to have the colorwork I wanted, green for the leaf and knit stitches and brown for the purls. I used a two-color cast on method so my first row would still match the rest of my pattern. Some of the strands on the thumb leaf motif were a little bit too long (I worked the entire mitt in fair isle) and caused the mitt to bunch up. I ended up cutting the worst 8 offenders and tieing them up and weaving in those ends as well. Now it’s perfect! I love wearing it so much it’ll be hard to take it off long enough to get a shower today!

I ended up learning a bit more about fair isle and colorwork in general on this project. Here’s what my supplies looked like. There were more when I ended than when I started:

I started out with nothing but the pattern, a set of size 3 DPNs in bamboo, and the yarn, Berroco Comfort DK. I got frustrated with the DPNs because the yarn wasn’t sliding well. I’d like to get more Addi Turbo and Bernat Aero needles, or even some more BaleneII. Unfortunately, this is all I have in size 3 so I’m stuck with them for now. I did just buy a square circular size 3 DPN but I’m afraid that it might mess up my gauge on the second mitt. I do plan on using the new circular to make some gift mitts 2-at-a-time magic loop style. As I worked, I added a cute stitch marker I made to help keep track of the beginning and end of the round.

Then I made myself a row counter because I couldn’t find any I liked. The most brilliant addition to my supplies is the little thingy that keeps your yarns from getting tangled when doing colorwork. I picked it up at one of my local shops, and it’s been one of the best purchase ever! I highly recommend them for all colorwork projects. It take a little while to figure out how to get your tension right while wearing one, but it pays off. Unfortunately, I also had to add a small crochet hook to the little kit because I made a few mistakes in the 2X2 rib. I kept my colors right, but when sleepy would mess up the knits and purls. It turns out it’s very difficult to drop a stitch, run it down and work it back up when doing colorwork! Finally, I put the whole thing into the perfectly sized bag that choperena made for me in the Dr. Horrible Swap.

Here’s a few more pictures of the finished mitt for your drooling pleasure. This pattern is tons of fun and I highly recommend it. If you decide to try to tackle it with colors like mine, feel free to contact me with questions. Heck, with any luck after my big swatch project, I’ll be able to make my own leafy mitts that I like more and have even more green leaves! I’d love to see more of the ‘sapling’ knit ribs grow into having leaves and buds on them. We’ll see, it’s back to some special gift crafting and swatches for me in the meantime.

 

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Doll Found in Glove

January 3, 2010

I took my dogs out for a nice walk through the neighborhood and when we got back into the complex, I saw something sticking out of the melting ice mess near a frequented parking space. The last snow we had was more than a week ago. For something to be buried in the ice, it had to have been missing for quite a while. I kicked at it with my shoe a couple times to loosen it and eventually pulled a grey glove covered in gravely slush and still frozen into a brick-like shape from the sludge. I carried the dripping mass home to throw out, but on the way I swear the glove was trying to tell me that it was still good and was begging for a second life.

I deposited the dripping mass into the bathroom sink and started scrubbing with some antibacterial dish soap to see just what kind of condition this glove was in. The suds were black the glove was so dirty. The warm water quickly defrosted it though and I tossed the clean smelling damp thing into the dryer with a pair of blue jeans. It came out stunning. Clearly, this wasn’t a glove ment for the garbage.

Random lost glove

I knew immediately that it would be a doll. I’m not sure if it was the brand name “The North Face” or if it was the finger pads that determined the glove’s fate as a doll. I took it into my crafting lair and set to work. First I removed the palm grip and the wrist elastic with a seam ripper being careful not to damage the grey fleece fabric. I cut the index and middle finger up into the glove about two inches and then straight across to make what would become the legs and body of the glove. Next I cut off the ring finger and pinky finger cutting down the ring finger to make it the same length as the pinky. I pinned the best pieces of palm fabric togther centering the logo as best I could and free-handed a circle with  my scissors to make the doll’s head. The whole thing was stitched together and now I have a sweet little n-face doll.

 

North Face glove doll

Finglerless shark gloves

September 24, 2009

Somehow I ended up at a page on etsy.com that had fingerless shark gloves. Go to etsy and check these ones out for a killer comparison. I really like the idea of gloves as different animals, and sharks are brilliant for it, but I wasn’t impressed with the execution. I just don’t see the shark in them. It’s a little too creative of an interpretation for me. I also think that there shouldn’t be any felt used on gloves because gloves need to be washed regularly.

I decided that night that I should sew some shark gloves because I wanted a pair, and I wanted something very different from what was being offered. I made a pattern by tracing my hands and adding to it to get the right thickness. They came out just a little too big, but not bad for my first try. I’ve also decided I need a nice pair of fabric pinking shears. It’s a good Christmas idea if you need to shop for me. It’ll help make more realistic shark teeth in addition to other things.

The coolest part of the gloves may be the fins, but having the color be lighter on the bottom just like a real shark is pretty cool too. I’ve considered adding gills, but I have yet to come up with a way to stitch them on so they look good.

The reason these shark gloves are so cool is because they remind me of my grandpa. He used to use this shark puppet that I have as a tickle monster. It’s very similar looking and has smaller teeth and a pink mouth. It’s made of a very short fur fabric. I love it, but it’s just too beat up and special for every day use. These washable fleece sharkies are perfect for every day wear and you can evey drive, shop, or attend class in them since you don’t lose any hand function like you do in a shark hand puppet. It was even a nasty cold day out to give me a god excuse to wear them out and about to class and physical therapy! It’s going to be a good winter if I get to wear these all over. I’m contemplating making some panda gloves for myself and I’m gusesing some of my friends will want other critters like monkeys as gifts.